What is Bad Breath?

Bad breath also known as halitosis is a problem with almost the majority of the population that occurs due to many varied reasons. It causes a bad odour in the mouth and causes an unpleasant feeling to the person listening to us while we speak.

What causes Bad Breath?

There are a number of things that can cause bad breath. It’s usually the result of poor oral hygiene. If bacteria build up in your mouth, the toxins produced can cause your breath to smell. Bacteria break down pieces of food in the mouth, and may release an unpleasant-smelling gas. Any food trapped on your teeth – particularly between them – is broken down by bacteria, which may cause bad breath.

Persistent bad breath can sometimes be a sign of gum disease. Eating strongly flavoured foods, such as onions and garlic, can also cause your breath to smell, as can smoking and drinking alcohol.

Occasionally, bad breath can occur after an infection or illness, or as a result of taking certain types of medication.

  • Tobacco: Tobacco products cause their own types of mouth odor. Additionally, they increase the chances of gum disease which can also cause bad breath.
  • Food: The breakdown of food particles stuck in the teeth can cause odors. Some foods such as onions and garlic can also cause bad breath. After they are digested, their breakdown products are carried in the blood to the lungs where they can affect the breath.
  • Dry mouth: Saliva naturally cleans the mouth. If the mouth is naturally dry or dry due to a specific disease, such as xerostomia, odors can build up.
  • Dental hygiene: Brushing and flossing ensure the removal of small particles of food that can build up and slowly break down, producing odor. A film of bacteria called plaque builds up if brushing is not regular. This plaque can irritate the gums and cause inflammation between the teeth and gums called periodontitis. Dentures that are not cleaned regularly or properly can also harbor bacteria that cause halitosis.
  • Crash diets: Fasting and low-carbohydrate eating programs can produce halitosis. This is due to the breakdown of fats producing chemicals called ketones. These ketones have a strong aroma.
  • Drugs: Certain medications can reduce saliva and, therefore, increase odors. Other drugs can produce odors as they breakdown and release chemicals in the breath. Examples include nitrates used to treat angina, some chemotherapy chemicals, and some tranquilizers, such as phenothiazines. Individuals who take vitamin supplements in large doses can also be prone to bad breath.
  • Mouth, nose, and throat conditions: Sometimes, small, bacteria-covered stones can form on the tonsils at the back of the throat and produce odor. Also, infections or inflammation in the nose, throat, or sinuses can cause halitosis.
    Foreign body: Bad breath can be caused if they have a foreign body lodged in their nasal cavity, especially in children.
  • Diseases: Some cancers, liver failure, and other metabolic diseases can cause halitosis, due to the specific mixes of chemicals that they produce. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can cause bad breath due to the regular reflux of stomach acids.

How to get rid of Bad breath?

The primary method to get rid of bad breath is to improve your oral hygiene. Other lifestyle changes and home remedies for bad breath include:

    • Brush the teeth: Be sure to brush at least twice a day, preferably after each meal.
    • Floss: Flossing reduces the build-up of food particles and plaque from between the teeth. Brushing only cleans around 60 percent of the surface of the tooth.
    • Clean dentures: Anything that goes into your mouth, including dentures, a bridge, or a mouth guard, should be cleaned as recommended on a daily basis. Cleaning prevents the bacteria from building up and being transferred back into the mouth. Changing toothbrush every 2 to 3 months is also important for similar reasons.
    • Brush tongue: Bacteria, food, and dead cells commonly build up on the tongue, especially in smokers or those with a particularly dry mouth. A tongue scraper can sometimes be useful.
    • Avoid dry mouth: Drink plenty of water. Avoid alcohol and tobacco, both of which dehydrate the mouth. Chewing gum or sucking a sweet, preferably sugar-free, can help stimulate the production of saliva. If the mouth is chronically dry, a doctor may prescribe medication that stimulates the flow of saliva.
    • Diet: Avoid onions, garlic, and spicy food. Sugary foods are also linked to bad breath. Reduce coffee and alcohol consumption. Eating a breakfast that includes rough foods can help clean the back of the tongue.

Take a look at the infographic.

Or else is it something serious?

See your dentist, dental hygienist or dental therapist first if you still have bad breath after making changes to improve your dental hygiene.

You may also need to visit your GP as there may be a medical cause that needs to be investigated.

Don’t try to hide the smell of your breath when seeking medical advice as it may make it more difficult to find out what’s causing the problem.

Do I have Bad Breath?

It’s not always easy to tell if you have bad breath. Other people may notice it first, but they could feel uncomfortable telling you.

A simple test to find out whether you have bad breath is to lick the inside of your wrist with the back of your tongue and wait a few seconds until the saliva dries. If your wrist smells unpleasant, it’s likely your breath does, too.

© 2017 - Copyrights Reserved Nuface Dental Health Care

Made with and   by AnoopRajiv